Donor/Sponsor Benefits:

Free autographed copy of each book, volume discount on bulk purchases, company website and/or name listed in each book and on author’s website with global audience. Most of all, a great big thank you for helping to provide hope to millions of domestic violence survivors around the world! Thank you!

Coming soon

Learning to Dance Again: Abuse in the Rearview Mirror

 

“Good girls don’t fight.”

I beg to differ. Once we step into the arena of life, the fight begins. If walking through childhood and adult domestic violence and abuse, suicidal thoughts, divorce and single parenting, standing in free food lines, bankruptcy, breast cancer, raising young family members, caregiving for elderly parents while battling cancer at the same time but overcoming all against the odds, consider Carolyn Reese a top rate fighter.

Carolyn Reese is a speaker, author, advocate against domestic violence, and Who’s Who 2023 who emerged triumphant over what appeared to be hopeless. As your tour guide, Carolyn lifts the veil to provide a glimpse of the horrors experienced behind closed doors.

Success and overcoming are painful and costly, but failure travels through generations. Learning to Dance Again: Abuse in the Rearview Mirror will provide hope, courage and a roadmap to help take the hard steps in a new direction.  It’s never too late to dream again and it’s never too late to learn to dance again!

Carolyn’s interview on Know the Cause begins at 7:28.

Carolyn, a third generation survived of childhood domestic violences and adult domestic violence and abuse emerged triumphant over what appeared to be hopeless situations.  “The journey to healing and wholeness is very painful and costly.  Failure to take this journey cost so much more.  In fact, it lasts a lifetime with perpetual payments traveling through generations.” (Reese, Carolyn, 2023). This war can be won.  This war must be won!

“The trauma caused by childhood neglect, sexual or domestic abuse and war wreaks havoc in our bodies. War zones may be nearer than you think, as the 25 percent of U.S. citizens raised with alcoholic relatives might attest. Severe trauma is encoded in the viscera.”  Van Der Kolk, Bessell, (2014) The Body Keeps the Score, Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma, Penguin Books

Viscera is defined as the soft internal organs of our body, including the lungs, the heart, and the organs of the digestive, excretory and reproductive systems.  

“A life completely devoid of trauma, as we’re learning, is highly unlikely.  Traumas do not sleep, even with death, bur, rather, continue to look for fertile ground of resolution in the children of the following generations. Fortunately, human beings are resilient and are capable of healing most types of traumas.  We just need the right insights and tools.”  Wolynn, Mark (2016) It Didn’t Start With You, How Inherited Family Trauma, Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle, Penguin Books.

The costs to society are staggering and poorly understood. In a 2010 study, economists calculated that the average cost of a single sexual assault in the United States amounted to $240,776 — from the victim’s pain and suffering, medical bills, lost productivity, judicial system expenses and the lost productivity from the incarcerated offender. One aggravated assault costs society about $107,020, with $95,023 from pain and suffering, plus the burden of increased risk of homicide.  African American females experience intimate partner violence at a rate 35% higher than that of white females, and about 2.5 times the rate of women of other races.

Based on this figure alone, the total cost to the United States of the almost 5 million domestic violence cases per year is about $460 billion. In other words, if we could find a way to reduce these incidents by half, the benefits would be the same as making the country at least $230 billion better off every year. That’s nearly 10 times the entire annual Justice Department budget. The Washington Post, By Bjorn Lomborg and Michelle A. Williams, February 22, 2018. Bjorn Lomborg is president of the Copenhagen Consensus Center. Michelle A. Williams is dean of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Carolyn notes current reflects there are 1 billion globally impacted by childhood domestic violence. 

also Coming soon

Defeating the Enemy Cancer 

 

“For men, additive childhood misfortune, physical abuse by father and frequent abuse by either parent increased cancer risk.  For women, physical abuse by mother and frequent abuse by either parent increased cancer risk.”  Published in final edited HHS Public Access, J Aging Health, 2012 September:24(6):948-984. doi:1177/0898264312449184.

 

Coming soon

 

Learning to Dance Again: Abuse in the Rearview Mirror

“Good girls don’t fight.”

I beg to differ. Once we step into the arena of life, the fight begins. If walking through childhood and adult domestic violence and abuse, suicidal thoughts, divorce and single parenting, standing in free food lines, bankruptcy, breast cancer, raising young family members, caregiving for elderly parents while battling cancer at the same time but overcoming all against the odds, consider Carolyn Reese a top rate fighter.

Carolyn Reese is a speaker, author, advocate against domestic violence, and Who’s Who 2023 who emerged triumphant over what appeared to be hopeless. As your tour guide, Carolyn lifts the veil to provide a glimpse of the horrors experienced behind closed doors.

Success and overcoming are painful and costly, but failure travels through generations. Learning to Dance Again: Abuse in the Rearview Mirror will provide hope, courage and a roadmap to help take the hard steps in a new direction.  It’s never too late to dream again and it’s never too late to learn to dance again!

Donor/sponsor benefits:

Free autographed copy of each book, volume discount on bulk purchases, company website and/or name listed in each book and on author’s website with global audience. Most of all, a great big thank you for helping to provide hope to millions of domestic violence survivors around the world! Thank you!

Carolyn’s interview on Know the Cause begins at 7:28.

Carolyn, a third generation survived of childhood domestic violences and adult domestic violence and abuse emerged triumphant over what appeared to be hopeless situations.  “The journey to healing and wholeness is very painful and costly.  Failure to take this journey cost so much more.  In fact, it lasts a lifetime with perpetual payments traveling through generations.” (Reese, Carolyn, 2023). This war can be won.  This war must be won!

“The trauma caused by childhood neglect, sexual or domestic abuse and war wreaks havoc in our bodies. War zones may be nearer than you think, as the 25 percent of U.S. citizens raised with alcoholic relatives might attest. Severe trauma is encoded in the viscera.”  Van Der Kolk, Bessell, (2014) The Body Keeps the Score, Brain, Mind, and Body in the Healing of Trauma, Penguin Books

Viscera is defined as the soft internal organs of our body, including the lungs, the heart, and the organs of the digestive, excretory and reproductive systems.  

“A life completely devoid of trauma, as we’re learning, is highly unlikely.  Traumas do not sleep, even with death, bur, rather, continue to look for fertile ground of resolution in the children of the following generations. Fortunately, human beings are resilient and are capable of healing most types of traumas.  We just need the right insights and tools.”  Wolynn, Mark (2016) It Didn’t Start With You, How Inherited Family Trauma, Shapes Who We Are and How to End the Cycle, Penguin Books.

The costs to society are staggering and poorly understood. In a 2010 study, economists calculated that the average cost of a single sexual assault in the United States amounted to $240,776 — from the victim’s pain and suffering, medical bills, lost productivity, judicial system expenses and the lost productivity from the incarcerated offender. One aggravated assault costs society about $107,020, with $95,023 from pain and suffering, plus the burden of increased risk of homicide.  African American females experience intimate partner violence at a rate 35% higher than that of white females, and about 2.5 times the rate of women of other races.

Based on this figure alone, the total cost to the United States of the almost 5 million domestic violence cases per year is about $460 billion. In other words, if we could find a way to reduce these incidents by half, the benefits would be the same as making the country at least $230 billion better off every year. That’s nearly 10 times the entire annual Justice Department budget. The Washington Post, By Bjorn Lomborg and Michelle A. Williams, February 22, 2018. Bjorn Lomborg is president of the Copenhagen Consensus Center. Michelle A. Williams is dean of the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health.

Carolyn notes current reflects there are 1 billion globally impacted by childhood domestic violence. 

also Coming soon

Defeating the Enemy Cancer 

 

“For men, additive childhood misfortune, physical abuse by father and frequent abuse by either parent increased cancer risk.  For women, physical abuse by mother and frequent abuse by either parent increased cancer risk.”  Published in final edited HHS Public Access, J Aging Health, 2012 September:24(6):948-984. doi:1177/0898264312449184.